EWG: Climate Change Increases Crop Insurance Costs

A new Environmental Working Group analysis found the majority of Midwestern counties with increased precipitation between 2001 and 2020 also had growing crop insurance costs. The report alleges the increased crop insurance costs were due to wetter weather linked to climate change. Between 2001 and 2020, farmers in the eight Midwest states received almost $14.5 billion in crop insurance indemnity payments for reduced crop yields or revenue due to excess moisture and precipitation. In all, 661 counties got a crop insurance indemnity payment for excess moisture at some point during that period, adding up to $12.9 billion. EWG claims the Crop Insurance Program undermines the adoption of conservation practices like cover crops that can help farmers adapt to the effects of climate change, such as extreme precipitation events that are expected to continue occurring more frequently. The organization is using the study in a call to make several reforms to the structure of crop insurance.

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